In the Loop with Andy Andrews

On this week’s episode, I’m answering a listener question on how to ask exceptional questions to facilitate great conversations.

 

If you can figure out how other people make subconscious choices, you will stand out.

  • You are competing.
  • I don’t care if you have an hourly job—you’re an entrepreneur.
  • If you don’t think you’re an entrepreneur, then you’re closer to getting fired than you should be.
  • The competition that really makes a difference is not the obvious kind that’s sitting right in front of you.

 

Most people are only concerned with how to tell people something, but communication is a two-way street.

  • Ask questions that really pertain to the person you’re talking to.
  • Find a way to edify and encourage.
  • Somebody who is a great communicator and question-asker is more valuable.

 

Chart your path.

  • Write down three or four questions whose answers you likely know already and prepare a response that will immediately connect the answers with somebody you know.
  • For instance, ask someone where they’re from and have something to say about the answer.
  • Read about the different states and find out what the most visited places are, what the big football teams are, the biggest problems, myths, etc.
  • It’s not faking it if you’re learning and getting better.

 

Tune in to hear a surprise interruption from one of the young Andrews boys, which offers up a good example of how they speak to their father.

Questions for Andy

Would you like to run something by Andy? Contact us and your question might be featured on the show!

  • Phone: 1-800-726-ANDY
  • Email: InTheLoop@AndyAndrews.com
  • Facebook.com/AndyAndrews

Twitter.com/AndyAndrews

Direct download: ITL239.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 5:23pm CST

On this week’s episode, I answer a listener’s question on how to determine when, how, and how often to use your “best story.”

 

We all hear, “Your worst times can become your best times.”

  • Your worst times really can write the ticket for the rest of your life.
  • My worst time is something I never would have chosen in a million years, and yet it was the time that the rest of my life—and my best story—was really built upon.
  • Picking your best story has a lot to do with relatability, which is key for me when telling my story of living under a pier.
  • I’m trying to use my story to help people understand that even though it might look like the world is ending for them, it’s not true.

 

Your best story may not come about because of anything you’ve ever chosen or done.

  • However, it may be the doorway to a mine you can dig things out of that are relatable and valuable to other people.
  • So many of the topics I’ve talked about in my books and speeches have come from a single event in my life.
  • Lessons of persistence, humility, seeking wisdom, how to act, how to take action, entrepreneurship, and so much more came from the mine that is my best story.

 

Tune in to hear how an old boss’s mistake almost got me thrown in jail—and how that mistake did and did not affect both our lives for the next quarter-century.

 

Questions for Andy

Would you like to run something by Andy? Contact us and your question might be featured on the show!

  • Phone: 1-800-726-ANDY
  • Email: InTheLoop@AndyAndrews.com
  • Facebook.com/AndyAndrews
  • Twitter.com/AndyAndrews
Direct download: ITL238_This_Is_the_Key_to_Getting_People_to_Listen_to_You_.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:45am CST

On this week’s episode, I’m addressing a listener question on how you can become impervious to insult and keep the attention of your audience.

 

I realized by watching other comedians that some would have more problems with hecklers than others.

  • Generally, hecklers keyed in on the performers who had a more arrogant attitude or a pushy demeanor. I’m not saying they were that way, but that was the perception of the audience.
  • They were also more likely to put out a vibe where people wanted to challenge them.
  • I decided that I wanted to be friends with the audience.

 

There are things in your profession that you will always have to deal with.

  • The same rules of comedy apply to great teaching, for instance.
  • Keep a list of things that could occur during your presentation and decide in advance what you’d say if they happened.
  • Take a good, close look at how you present. What do you do physically?
  • Moving unexpectedly to a different area of the room will grab listeners’ attention.

 

Tune in to hear Andy’s secret for handling a situation where someone is nodding off or focusing on something else, and find out how he gets their attention and keeps them from being a distraction.

 

Questions for Andy

Would you like to run something by Andy? Contact us and your question might be featured on the show!

  • Phone: 1-800-726-ANDY
  • Email: InTheLoop@AndyAndrews.com
  • Facebook.com/AndyAndrews
  • Twitter.com/AndyAndrews
Direct download: ITL237_You_CAN_Command_an_Audience_Dont_Try_to_Beat_Em_Join_Em.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 10:31am CST

On this week’s episode, I’m finishing the discussion of my career pivots and how I transitioned out of comedy into what I do today.

 

I was on a bus with Kenny Rogers and we were talking about how we had grown up and sharing times in our lives.

  • At some point I told him about the Seven Decisions, living under the pier, and Jones.
  • He said, “You ought to start talking about that on stage,” and I’m like, “Where on stage? It’s not funny.”
  • He told me I wasn’t a joke teller but a talker and a storyteller.
  • I starting throwing it in and transitioning back into comedy, but people were telling me that the serious part was their favorite part.

 

I realized more people asked me to speak on serious topics than were asking for the comedy.

  • This odd thing developed where I was funny, but it had a point.
  • I realized that God has used all these crazy things in my life to make me into a very different kind of speaker.
  • As I transitioned into speaking, I put together the Storms of Perfection books.
  • Then The Traveler’s Gift came along and I started writing the story that was born from living under the pier, and that developed into being more of an author.
  • The writing forced me to think.
  • To sit there and think, read through something, take notes, and ponder is not too hard, but people think it is and they choose not to do it.

 

Tune in to hear about the process of “getting to the bottom of the pool” and how that’s forcing me to learn new ways of explaining the topics in the next book I’m writing.

 

Questions for Andy

Would you like to run something by Andy? Contact us and your question might be featured on the show!

  • Phone: 1-800-726-ANDY
  • Email: InTheLoop@AndyAndrews.com
  • Facebook.com/AndyAndrews
  • Twitter.com/AndyAndrews
Direct download: ITL236_The_Wild_Story_of_My_Career-_How_I_Became_a_Speaker_pt._3_of_3.mp3
Category:Podcast -- posted at: 8:57am CST